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Forming the ISDC (Interdisciplinary Software Development Collective)

I am growing tired of my unemployment and I have decided (took me long enough) to form ISDC or the Interdisciplinary Software Development Collective.  More than simply a technical or software consulting company where software engineers are bought and sold (veritable slaves), the ISDC is a software development and design collective that works with companies to build and/or improve their current software needs.

Rather than trying to find a consultant to fit the need of a client (it seems that a software engineer these days needs to know so much technology just to find some company to hire him/her), we create a virtual consultant made up of experts that can solve the problem in and interdisciplinary way.  For example, if a project calls for developing a cool new Web 2.0 application--say for managing sales people or providing a multimedia platform targeted at the financial community--then this team will have at its disposal the experts needed to build or redesign a software product.  Such experts might consist of a web 2.0 developer that is a javascript and ajax guru, a web designer who knows how to make the web application attractive and simple to use, a software engineer to build the server object model and a DBA to build the data model.

The collective part is that there is no centralized location.  In fact there isn't an ISDC headquarters.  Instead there is a decentralized network of experts each of which can review resumes and job specs, help advertise and find potential business, and tackle problems in a stealth-like team.  And, we all share the profits--of course those who do more get more, but the idea is to keep the money coming in and providing good money to all.

This idea stems from this recession we're in.  So many technical software experts are unemployed and trying to find work.  I've been unemployed for more than a year!  And I need to make money to provide for my family and to pay off enormous debt, and I know there are many people with my skills who are in the same situation. 

Today, businesses that are hiring contractors and permanent staff are being so picky because they want to hire just the right person with a constrained set of skills rather than to look for thinkers, intellectuals and the kind of person that no matter the technology and level of experience with a specific technology, shouldn't be a factor.  If a software engineer has 20 years of experience (me) and can learn on the fly, then I believe that person makes a better fit, not only for the project, but for the company as a whole.  I believe that software engineers who are extremely intelligent--and you have to be to actually design and write software--could be useful in a number of ways.

So building this distributed development and design concept takes effort and time but I am willing to make it all happen.  What we need is you to jump in and help out. We require no money from any ISDC member.  Your intellect and experience are your currency.  We just need talented, entrepreneurial, intelligent people like you, so join me in this.  Just email me or leave comments and let's get this party started (sorry for the cliche).





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Comments

Harish said…
Woooooooooooooooooooooooooooooow /Hey thanks man!! you are so good. I think this the perfect work.
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